lets talk tire wrapping

Discussion in 'Tech Forum' started by djhurayt, Jul 23, 2019.

  1. djhurayt

    djhurayt New Member

    Who does it and why.

    Are you just wrapping at the end of an event until the next ???
    Are you using a softener/treatment then wrapping ???
    How about long term i.e. over the winter ???
    Just a gimmick ???

    All comments, pro & con welcomed
     
  2. Kruizen

    Kruizen Control Rider

    Ok wtf is tire wrapping?
     
    scotsman459 likes this.
  3. tdelegram

    tdelegram Control Rider

    No idea what rapping is other than gift and hip hop, but with a liter bike tires wear out so fast it doesn’t matter.
     
  4. djhurayt

    djhurayt New Member

    The idea is to take plastic wrap and wrap the tread of the tire after the end of the day/weekend to help preserve the natural oils in the rubber from gassing off any easier than necessary. That is my understanding. I thing the go-kart and circle track racers do it, but it is due to using a tire softener or other tire treatments.

    You know that blueish look the rubber gets after sitting a for a while of non-use. My understanding is this is the oil that have come out of the rubber and has oxidized and the wrapping help
    1) keep air (ozone, oxygen) away from the tire
    2) the compression helps somewhat in keeping the oils in the rubber as opposed to on the surface of the rubber
     
  5. bmart

    bmart Control Rider

    Sure feels like a gimmick to me. I run OLD tires and they never move a mm during track day abuse until the rubber is gone.
     
  6. chrisplm

    chrisplm Chris Control Rider

    I've done it to tires that I'm storing over the winter. Those are stored indoors so they don't crack in the cold. I don't know how much it helps or not, but it can't hurt, plus it keeps the rubber from marking up the carpet in the room I'm storing them in and it keeps the room from spelling like rubber. But like Tom said, in the summer, it seems like I burn through them so fast, no time to wrap them :D.
    According to Dunlop, Ozone is a concern as well, so don't store them next to furnaces or electric motors (crazy right?)
     
  7. tdelegram

    tdelegram Control Rider

    The shiny coat on new tires is peanut oil if I am remaining correctly, it’s places as a protectant and to keep the oils from seeping. You could reapply something like that or just wear them out.
     
  8. HondaGalToo

    HondaGalToo Control Rider

    Never heard of anyone doing it...
     
    vinny337 likes this.
  9. Mike:p

    Mike:p Don’t be a Hero, be consistent.

    I thought that years ago that shine on new tires was mold release. But the tire manufacturers today have the interior of there molds coated with a Teflon like material to allow the tires to come out easily. That is why the super slick surface of new tires must be scrubbed-in.
     
    scotsman459 likes this.
  10. Kruizen

    Kruizen Control Rider

    Thought you needed to use tire shine between each session and at the end of the day, to keep them looking new.
     
    scotsman459 and Mike:p like this.
  11. bmart

    bmart Control Rider

    Brands are not all the same either. I have been told for years that Dunlops don't heat cycle, and I believe it. Mine heat-cool many times over the course of their use with me (can be years), including sitting in the sun and/or on the warmers all day but not used. They never alter the grip they deliver to me. I've also not had to scrub any tires in. They work right from mile 1.
     
  12. Raceless man

    Raceless man Member

    I'd try snake oil first.
     
  13. vinny337

    vinny337 Vin is in...Beastmode! Control Rider

    News to me, I wouldn't waste my time....:D
     
  14. Goldie

    Goldie Member

    Never heard of such foolishness. :cool::cool:
     
  15. scotsman459

    scotsman459 New Member

    Tire moulds are teflon coated, which causes the 'silky smooth' surface, I'm pretty sure most manufacturers dont use a release agent now. Storing tires over the winter, just keep them in a climate stable environment. I have heard of ceran wrapping them, I tried it once and all I found, was moisture build up under the wrap. Personally, if I finish the season on a decent tire, I will allow a slow cool down before loading the bike and once home, i keep the bike/tires off the ground at home. That's all I do for my 1000.

    Sent from my SM-N976V using Tapatalk
     

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