Pitt Race - coaching tips

mdhokie

New Member
I liked the last few coaching tips threads on NCBike and Summit Point. CRs: what are the most common mistakes you saw last weekend, and best tips for a good lap time at Pitt Race? I want to be faster!
 

darth nater

Staff member
Control Rider
N2
For reference...



This past weekend I personally was working on hitting apexes more consistently. There are a lot of corners on this track, and many that flow together so hitting apexes consistently is important.

A lot of people like to "swoop" too much in the esses and going into T14. There are more efficient lines that are best by watching some videos of good riders (not me) circulating.

 

HondaGalToo

Control Rider
Thought of another: T14 (old T7) the blind right hander down the hill - enter that turn about 2/3 to the left, you don't need to be all the way on the left side of the track to enter T14. There is an entry cone there on the left, but you don't need to be on the left edge of the track., just start your turn in at that cone.
 

bmart

Control Rider
There are more efficient lines that are best by watching some videos of good riders (not me) circulating.
Beautiful video. You were moving right along! I have to get back to that place. Haven't been since it was only 1/2 done.
 

darth nater

Staff member
Control Rider
N2
Beautiful video. You were moving right along! I have to get back to that place. Haven't been since it was only 1/2 done.
That wasn't me. I only wish I was remotely that fast.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

Motofun352

Control Rider
A couple of points, there is "THE" racing line and there are racing lines. If you watch a pro who is way out in front of the pack he will be on "THE" line. When in the pack or with someone right if front or behind him he will adjust his line to suit. This may confuse people, hopefully not. When off "THE" line, adjustments need to be made to throttle, braking and/or leaning to compensate and these adjustments ultimately effect overall performance. What is important is that you know what the preferred line is and know that when you deviate from it it's for a reason.
 

tdelegram

Control Rider
Folks,

Look at the map and think about your lap, where are you at full throttle the longest amount of time. I think there will be some arguments but 3 or 4 areas come to mind. Exiting the turn that sets up that full throttle section would identify that turn as one of the crucial turns on the track to generate a good lap time. So T1/2, T5/6, T14 (you can get to WOT and not shut off until 17, i think this is the longest WOT section on the track), T18, if taken correctly by entering a little slower and tighter one can get to WOT early and carry it to T1 (some may argue this is the most important turn). Going back to T14, it's set up by T12 and T13, so getting them correct while they are slow turns they can reward better lap time because of setting up T14. Another component to look at is risk, while T14 might lead to the longest section of WOT how many of us are WOT through T16 a high risk turn. If you're not breaking tracks down like this before you ride them you're leaving time on the table. To go fast you must think about what you're doing out there and put in place a plan and most importantly execute that plan. We all love going out and turning fun laps with our friends, but to try and improve at a steady pace you must think, plan, execute and evaluate results on an ongoing basis.

DO YOU HAVE A PLAN?

Tom
 

bmart

Control Rider
Jack, you've typed what I've said to many folks at track days. While there is a line, it is usually altered unless we're on our own out there. Nearly all of the time we're (coaches and riders) slightly off line in order to work through traffic. This is a much more useful skill, knowing how to use different lines to accomplish different goals, and understanding and planning for the changes those decisions cause.

If everyone was on "the line" we'd only pass in the straights, and that just isn't true.

A person's line is a whole different story. Watching a highly skilled rider on a 300 and another on a litre bike beast highlights a lot. Trackdays provide the precise environment for them to explore their skills, their bikes capabilities, and different lines. I rarely take the same line over and over on the track. I'm always looking for a smoother surface, more grip, a way to enter or exit faster by altering the other, or a host of other things. THEN I take that knowledge and try to string a clean lap together. For me, THAT means using all of those skills still run a clean lap while working around others.
 

Lenny ZX9R

Control Rider
I don't do turn 16 at WOT but I do get there in 5th gear! I try to get down the hill 14 by hitting the apex and getting on the gas as soon as I can, without putting myself on my head, this gives me a good drive at the bottom of the hill 15! We, Kenny Kerns (Manix) and I did a couple of 1:47 flats this past weekend! It took putting alot of parts of the track together to do that! Each section has its own challenges!
 

Motofun352

Control Rider
The above are all good points. Perhaps the best way to teach the track is to explain which turns are late apex, double apex, where maintenance throttle is appropriate, where a "squirt" is rewarded, etc. I never really appreciated the old Beaver until Buck did a track walk with me. It was eye opening and I still think about it.
 

bmart

Control Rider
Track walks are a whole 'nother thing. I do them a lot and usually get one to three guys to join me but most don't want to bother. You can learn so much at that "speed."
 

2blueyam

Member
Track walks are a whole 'nother thing. I do them a lot and usually get one to three guys to join me but most don't want to bother. You can learn so much at that "speed."
Some of it you don’t want to know, like how much grass is growing in the middle of the track at NJMP.
 

bmart

Control Rider
You have that right! CMP had some grooves that you could almost get your front time down in. not any more!
 
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