Thoughts on ATP.

Hello all.
Since this is the member feedback section, I thought that I would offer some feedback.
I attended the Advanced Training Program at NC bike today. AJ and EZ were our instructors. AJ was with me all day as I fumbled around the track pretending that I knew how to ride...
BLUF, this was the best $400ish that I've ever spent on motorcycling. I am the type of person that enjoys learning things on my own. I can't tell you how many hours I have spent scouring YouTube looking for instructional videos (Nick Ienatsch, Sylvain Guintoli, Gordon Ramsay) and watching MotoAmerica, MotoGP and so on. I thought that I was a decent rider and that I could maintain a pretty solid pace. Turns out that I was riding quite inefficiently and with a much higher level of risk than I could have been, all along. I took some GoPro footage of my riding at CMP on the 23rd of April and as hard as I tried there, I was still crossed up and not trail braking to any extent that I could be proud of. Upon noticing this, and being less stubborn than the younger version of myself, I decided to seek formal education (of which I've never had any when it comes to motorcycling). I found ATP and decided to give it a shot.
I was one on one with AJ all day and holy moly did I learn a lot. Without laying out the whole training, I'll say that I'm braking WAAAAAAAAY deeper, not just for the sake of braking late, but to put the bike in the right spot on the track to exit the turn, and for the first time my legs and core actually feel worked. I'm not ready to take a run at Cameron Beaubier, but my hips are more open, my shoulders are mostly pointed where they're supposed to be and my head is actually off of the centerline rather than just having an ass cheek hanging off with my head centered and a knee on the ground and damn it feels so much better when you get it right. I still have a ton to learn, and need to work to implement what I learned today and I'll continue to do so at various track days.
I'll return to the ATP when I feel confident that I've implemented today's lessons and continue to build on this foundation.

TLDR?

Yeah, it's pricy on paper but it's money very well spent.
 

pjzocc

Member
Nice review Dave. Thanks for this. I’ve been considering the program. Couple questions if I may:

What group do you ride in?

Did you monitor lap times? If so, did you drop time?

Looking back, is there something you should’ve focused on prior to going into the day?

What was your biggest takeaway from the program?
 
Nice review Dave. Thanks for this. I’ve been considering the program. Couple questions if I may:

What group do you ride in?

Did you monitor lap times? If so, did you drop time?

Looking back, is there something you should’ve focused on prior to going into the day?

What was your biggest takeaway from the program?

I ride in the Novice group. April 23rd was my first trackday with N2 and my first trackday since 2008.

I do not monitor lap times yet, however, i can assure you that I dropped time. A lot of time was spent behind the coach/instructor for me, initially. After lunch there was more time to be out front and analyzed.

I just went into everything with an open mind. I knew what I needed to focus on, but I didn't really understand how to fix it. AJ broke things down for me in a way that was easy to process and execute.

My biggest takeaway was going slow to go fast, if that makes any sense. I benefitted a lot from trail braking instruction and execution.

Hopefully that helps.

-dave
 
Nice review Dave. Thanks for this. I’ve been considering the program. Couple questions if I may:

What group do you ride in?

Did you monitor lap times? If so, did you drop time?

Looking back, is there something you should’ve focused on prior to going into the day?

What was your biggest takeaway from the program?
For reference, the fastest lap that I got on cam yesterday was a 1:46 with a little bit of traffic. I'll pick up a decent lap timer soon.
 

rob92

Control Rider
N2
Glad you had a great experience with ATP and our instructors. Just from reading your post and the words you’ve chosen, it sounds like youve unlocked what it is you need to work on. Getting direction, loading the tires, getting off the centerline of the bike… sounds Like you’re on the right track!
 
This first pic is from my first track day back on a bike since 2008. As you can see, I'm quite crossed up, the way I was used to riding for a very long time.

crossed up.jpg
 

Poper

Member
Way to go! 2 points really helped me, A) scoot back in the seat so my hips/body can get off the bike, and B) outside forearm resting on the tank. You’re getting it!
 

LeatherUp93

New Member
This is a pic from VIR South, one track day after ATP. Not quite as crossed up. Still work to do, but progress nonetheless.
View attachment 8421
Those two pics are vastly different, you should be super proud of the improvements you have made. Some individuals cannot comprehend what it takes to change one's mindset of what they have become use to doing to something completely different. Looking Great for sure!
 
Those two pics are vastly different, you should be super proud of the improvements you have made. Some individuals cannot comprehend what it takes to change one's mindset of what they have become use to doing to something completely different. Looking Great for sure!
I actually have pics taken at the same angle with the bike at roughly the same lean angle and the body positioning is even more apparent in that comparison. I'm not patting myself on the back, but I do see the vast differences that you mention, but know that I still have a lot of things to work on. I'm very familiar with having to practice in order to change old habits, as I was blessed to be part of an institution where adaptation was a key trait amongst its members. I find myself in the garage a couple of times a week with the bike on stands, working on opening my shoulders, getting my feet where they need to be on the pegs, dropping that outer forearm on the tank and so on (I do a lot of dry-firing on the bike, so to speak).
Thanks for the compliments, and maybe I'll see you out there someday with your rekindled track day spirit!
 

LeatherUp93

New Member
I actually have pics taken at the same angle with the bike at roughly the same lean angle and the body positioning is even more apparent in that comparison. I'm not patting myself on the back, but I do see the vast differences that you mention, but know that I still have a lot of things to work on. I'm very familiar with having to practice in order to change old habits, as I was blessed to be part of an institution where adaptation was a key trait amongst its members. I find myself in the garage a couple of times a week with the bike on stands, working on opening my shoulders, getting my feet where they need to be on the pegs, dropping that outer forearm on the tank and so on (I do a lot of dry-firing on the bike, so to speak).
Thanks for the compliments, and maybe I'll see you out there someday with your rekindled track day spirit!
Do not be afraid to pat yourself on the back for accomplishing something, ever! Unfortunately its a constant work in progress and we do the best we can with the time we have due to that thing called life. Keep it rubber side down... See ya out there at some point.
 

HondaGalToo

Control Rider
Excellent progress! And kudos for being open minded and working to change old habits. I had to to quite a bit of that myself after taking YCRS for the first time, LOL.
 
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